JW’s Financial Coaching Podcast JW’s Financial Coaching Podcast-A show devoted to answering your personal financial questions and covering current events in personal finance. Giving people a new perspective on their money!

January 24, 2017  
00:0000:00
  • In what ways debt free people think differently about money
  • The demographics of those who are debt free
  • Why giving plays a big role in those who are debt free
  • How you can help confirm my observations
  • Quote of the lesson from Wayne Dyer

 

When I first got into paying attention to my finances one of the first books I ready was the classic Millionaire Next Door by Dr. Tom Stanley. What I loved particularly about this book was the research Dr. Stanley did on real life millionaires. Not just athletes and entertainers. You really got insight into how millionaires think about earning, saving, and spending money.

Since then I’ve read other books by Tom Corley and Steve Siebold on how the wealthy think vs. the non-wealthy. Also there are books and research out there on how entrepreneurs think vs. traditional employees.

But today we are going to focus on how debt free people think. I focus on being debt free because that’s how Lisa and I live when it comes to our finances and after interviewing those who are debt free and coached with people on becoming debt free I’ve come to the realization that in general they seem to be doing better with money than most.

On today’s lesson I’m sharing some observations I have had about debt free people and how they view money. In addition I also share how I’m doing some research to help confirm these observations and how you can help.

The good news about looking at those who are debt free is that pretty much anyone can fall under that heading. You can be young or old, make a great income or make a little income, or be married or single. They can also have a lot of children but also have none. They can live in any part of the country, be of any race, ethnicity, or religion. But to me there are four main areas where debt free people think differently then those who are not.

  1. They have an idea of where there money is going
  2. They are prepared for emergencies
  3. They are continuous learners
  4. They are big givers

Debt Free people know where their money is going by having a budget they review and stick to each month. They also have financial goals and review them at least once a year to see how if they have accomplished those goals. They have a great sense of where their money is going each month which allows them to have a knowledge of how each financial decision they make impacts their finances.

They are also prepared for emergencies. Debt free people face fewer true financial emergencies because they are prepared for them to happen. If an unexpected expense does occur they simply have the money in their emergency fund to cover the cost. Know there is a chick or the egg debate on which comes first, having an emergency fund or becoming debt free, but those who are debt free very often have money in an emergency fund.

Continuous learning is also a big part of the thought process of those who are debt free. Whether it is books, podcasts, blogs or other medium, those who are debt free are always those who continue to learn in different areas of money. These areas might include thinks such as investing in stocks, investing in real estate, starting a small business, how to make more passive income, ways to cut your cable or grocery bill, better ways to budget, or how to cut expenses to pay off their mortgage sooner.

Finally giving plays a huge role in the lives of those who are debt free. They don’t become debt free just to be able to save and spend more on themselves. They do it so that they can then bless others in causes that they believe in.

There are a lot more ways that debt free people think differently about money but those are for another podcast. But those are my observations and would you be willing to help prove out these observations?

I’m currently conducting research for my next book project and want to know your thoughts on debt and money.

It’s a 9 question multiple choice survey and should take only a few minutes to complete. Please consider taking it no matter if you are debt free or not. Your opinions matter and will help validate the research either way.

The survey is 100% anonymous but depending on your answers you might be contacted for a followup survey as well which we’ll need your email for.

Please visit JWFinancialCoaching.com/Survey to participate and thank you in advance for your help. I’ll be using the research for at least a future upcoming webinar and hopefully can use the data for a new book release.

Other resources mentioned in the show:

Today's quote of the lesson is brought to you by Audible.com

“If you change the way you look at things, the things you look at change." ~ Wayne Dyer

Enjoyed this lesson? If so, please consider taking a few minutes to leave a review of the show either in Stitcher SmartRadio, or iTunes. For a step by step video of how that works, please watch this video on how to leave a review in iTunes.

You can subscribe to future podcasts through Stitcher SmartRadio or iTunes, Google Play or by downloading the iPhone app. Or you may listen to the podcast on the JW's Financial Coaching Facebook Fan page.

October 30, 2016  
00:0000:00
  • The most difficult loan to handle is the one from family and friends
  • Why we borrow from family and friends
  • The dangers in doing them
  • Why it is important to have to clear communication when lending to or borrowing from family and friends
  • Quote of the lesson

the-jws-financial-coaching-podcast_126

When I hear stories of people getting out of debt, the debt that gives them the most trouble is often a loan from a family member or friend. Giving or receiving loans from relatives or friends sounds like a good idea, but if you aren’t careful they can easily turn into a nightmare and easily lead to a ruin relationship.

Now most of you know I don’t recommend borrowing for anything, but what if you are already in the position of owing money to friends and family or are considering loaning money to a relative to help them get through a rough spot?

Today’s lesson we cover why it can be enticing to take out loans from family members and friends, discuss the dangers in doing them, how to handle these loans in the debt snowball, what happens if you can’t pay back a family member or friend, and a special discussion about co-signing and student loans.

Giving and receiving loans from a family member or friend occur often because it is easier to do then go to a bank or lending institution and go through all the paperwork and hassle. Perhaps you have bad credit and aren’t able to qualify for a loan from anywhere else. Or with low saving interest rates, you can make more by loaning it out to someone and get a better return than keeping it in a savings account in addition to “helping” out someone you care about.

However they often don’t work because since they are family or friends you don’t do the proper documentation and have a hand shake agreement. But after a few months go by, the “pay me back whenever” lender gets tired of not having his money back and seeing the borrower post on Instagram and Facebook about the nice dinner or vacation they just had. The leads to bitterness and resentment and at best leads to a strain in the relationship and at worse a total disolvement of the relationship and leading people to not talk for years.

In addition giving out a loan might not actually be a help to the individual, it might actually harm someone. Quite often these loans are given in a crisis situation due to a job loss or medical event and are used to not miss a payment on a car or mortgage.

But is this loan you are giving to them actually going to help their situation? Or is it just going to perpetuate the problem of poor financial management? That is something that needs to be considered before lending out money.

Since they cause a lot of strain on relationship I recommend treating them a little differently in the debt snowball. If I can move them up and pay them off sooner I would try. For example if you owe your in-laws $5,000 and have a $3,000 credit card balance I would try and pay off the $5,000 first, as long as you can make your own minimum payments. However if that loan from the in-laws is $20,000 I wouldn’t move it up the debt snowball.

What happens if you can’t pay? Well then you need to have clear communication with the lender and give them your entire financial picture and share why you can’t pay them at that particular time. Now this might be embarrassing to admit to them that you can’t pay. But it will help the relationship a lot more to sit down and be vulnerable instead of telling them “I’m working on it” and have no plan on how to actually do it.

With that being said I can’t recommend lending money to or borrowing from family or friends. The risk of running the relationship is too great.

Today's quote of the lesson is brought to you by A Tale of Two Houses 

Before borrowing money from a friend, decide which you need most.” ~ American Proverb

Enjoyed this lesson? If so, please consider taking a few minutes to leave a review of the show either in Stitcher SmartRadio, or iTunes. For a step by step video of how that works, please watch this video on how to leave a review in iTunes.

You can subscribe to future podcasts through Stitcher SmartRadio or iTunes, Google Play or by downloading the iPhone app. Or you may listen to the podcast on the JW's Financial Coaching Facebook Fan page.

August 17, 2016  
00:0000:00
  • The average US household financial stats
  • What these stats say about your economy
  • What to do to be better than average
  • Motivation to not be financially average
  • Quote of the lesson from Steve Siebold

The JW’s Financial Coaching Podcast_117

When I first started the blog and the podcast, one of my most popular posts that gained some traction was the Don’t be Average blog post. In this post I shared some average financial statistics on income, debt, and savings which I tried to paint a picture that the average financial situation in America isn’t all the great. Since the original post back in 2010 I updated it for 2011 and did one of my original podcast lessons on the same topic.

But I realized I hadn’t had an updated version since 2011 so on today’s lesson we’re going to cover the average financial stats in America for 2016. Among some of the statistics discussed in the show:

  • The Median Household income is $53,657 [1]
  • 1% of households that have a credit card have a balance at the end of each month with an average debt of $16,000[2]
  • The average car payment is now $503(!) over 68 months[3]
  • The average car lease payment is now $400 [4]
  • 2016 college graduates had an average student loan balance of $37,000[5]
  • For all households that have a student loan, one in seven, the median balance is $13K[6]
  • The savings rate is currently 5.3%[7]
  • 50% of Americans would have to borrow or sell something to pay for a $400 emergency[8]
  • 1 in 7 Americans have a negative net worth [9]

We go into depth more on each stat and explain why these are troubling statistics.

But we also explain why it can be used as motivation to get out from under the rut of being at or below average and what you can do to having a good personal economy.

This is just a great reminder that we can’t go through life taking advice from “He said, I heard, and everybody does.”

Today's quote of the lesson is brought to you by Audible.com

"Average People live beyond their means. Rich people live below theirs. ” ~ Steve Siebold

Enjoyed this lesson? If so, please consider taking a few minutes to leave a review of the show either in Stitcher SmartRadio, or iTunes. For a step by step video of how that works, please watch this video on how to leave a review in iTunes.

You can subscribe to future podcasts through Stitcher SmartRadio or iTunes, or by downloading the iPhone app. Or you may listen to the podcast on the JW's Financial Coaching Facebook Fan page.

[optin-cat id="13626"]

[1] http://www.deptofnumbers.com/income/us/

[2] http://www.valuepenguin.com/average-credit-card-debt

[3] http://www.cnbc.com/2016/06/02/us-borrowers-are-paying-more-and-for-longer-on-their-auto-loans.html

[4] http://www.cnbc.com/2016/06/02/us-borrowers-are-paying-more-and-for-longer-on-their-auto-loans.html

[5] https://studentloanhero.com/student-loan-debt-statistics-2016/

[6] https://www.brookings.edu/research/the-typical-household-with-student-loan-debt/

[7] http://www.tradingeconomics.com/united-states/personal-savings

[8] http://www.federalreserve.gov/econresdata/2014-report-economic-well-being-us-households-201505.pdf

[9] http://www.whig.com/20160808/household-debt-concerns-economists-lenders#

May 30, 2016  
00:0000:00
The role that the credit score plays in the financial industryWhat role should it play in your finances?What a credit score can't do for your financesBuild up other financial disciplines in your life, credit score won't matterQuote of the lesson from Tony Robbins

The JW’s Financial Coaching Podcast_107

There are tons of resources online about the credit score: ways to improve your credit score, how the credit scoring system works, and products you can buy to boost your score. But most of those resources harp on the importance of a credit score.

But why do we need a credit score? If you don't plan on borrowing money, do you actually need to worry about it?

On today's podcast lesson we are going to discuss the credit score and why I think it might be the most overrated measure in the financial world today. Do you need a credit score? Well perhaps, it mostly depends on your view of debt and whether or not you are going to be borrowing in the future.

Whether or not you need a credit score, I think it is more important to focus on what a credit score can't do with your money. It can't help us:

  • Save money
  • Invest money
  • Pay off our debt
  • Help us follow our budget

The way I look at a credit score is this-what's more important than a great score or no score, is NOT to have a bad score. Bad credit will haunt you in many ways, so if you have fallen behind or gotten dinged due to a foreclose or repossession, working on paying those old debts back is paramount to getting on solid financial ground.

If you do have a great credit score, there's nothing wrong with that, but what is it costing you? I've worked with a lot of couples who are struggling to save money but have a great credit score.

I just want to fight against the whole idea that the credit score is the be all, end all. It isn't and it isn't even close. In my opinion instead of focusing on improving your credit score first, I'd rather focus on saving, investing, paying off debt, and developing a solid budget. Doing those things first will improve your credit score, but focusing on your credit score first won't improve those other things.

As mentioned on the show, I've done a lot of other podcasts and blog posts on the topic of your credit score.  You can check them out below:

Today's quote of the lesson is brought to you by the JW's Financial Coaching Newsletter

“You either master money, or, on some level, money masters you!” Tony Robbins

Enjoyed this lesson? If so, please consider taking a few minutes to leave a review of the show either in Stitcher SmartRadio, or iTunes. For a step by step video of how that works, please watch this video on how to leave a review in iTunes.

You can subscribe to future podcasts through Stitcher SmartRadio or iTunes, or by downloading the iPhone app. Or you may listen to the podcast on the JW's Financial Coaching Facebook Fan page.

May 8, 2016  
00:0000:00
  • How are creditors and borrowers supposed to act
  • What a debt agreement actually is
  • Viewpoint from the borrower and the creditor
  • How to avoid the rat race all together
  • Quote of the lesson

Slide1

Do creditors have an obligation to lend money and treat borrowers with decency?

Do borrowers have a responsible to pay back their loans, even when it isn't convenient or beneficial to do so?

We tackle those tough questions on today's lesson. This lesson was inspired after listening to other shows and reading material such as David Graeber's book "Debt-The First 5,000 Years" that left a bad taste in my mouth.

To be honest doing research on this lesson really helped me form my opinion on this topic. Therfore my thought might be a little raw and hopefully they come across clearly.

But today we focus the morality of debt and we look at it from both a borrower and lender point of view.

What do we mean by debt? I'm focusing on the traditional borrowing of money from a bank or other lending institution. I'm not talking today about a debt to a friend or family member that is non-monetary.

But in my opinion from the borrowers point of view, we have a moral obligation to pay our debts if we have the money to do so. If debt becomes inconvenient, I don’t think you should just simply walk away. There is an obligation to pay when you signed the note. Not a promise to pay as long as you are able to, or a promise to pay as long as you have a job. It was to pay back no matter what. That’s why debt is often compared to slavery.
Now if you currently are behind to your creditors, you’ve walked away from your debt either voluntarily or involuntarily, or have filed bankruptcy in the past this lesson is not to judge you in any way. But I am fighting against the “It’s not your fault!” mentality when it comes to your debt.

On the flip side let’s look at the lender’s point of view. Obviously I’m not a big fan of debt, and because of that I could never be a lender because that would be hypocritical on my part. However I’m also not for making it illegal to lend out money either. But if you are going to loan money out, is it too hard to make sure you can loan money to people who have a realistic chance of paying it back?

It is too much to ask to take responsibility for your risky loans and not ask for protection from the government when those risky loans come in default? Subprime loans are risky, so if you take the risk, you should also take the loss. All I’m asking is for you to be fair.

Ultimately the best way to avoid the whole morality of debt to begin with is to not play the game all together. If you are in debt, make it a goal to payback all your creditors as soon as possible so that you can be done with them.
When the option of debt is removed from the table, you have to think differently and make different choices. Those choices might be painful at the start, but over the long run they will lead to growth.

Previous lessons mentioned on the show:

Today's quote of the lesson is brought to you by the JW's Financial Coaching Newsletter

"Better to go to bed hungry than to wake up in debt.”Unknown

Enjoyed this lesson? If so, please consider taking a few minutes to leave a review of the show either in Stitcher SmartRadio, or iTunes. For a step by step video of how that works, please watch this video on how to leave a review in iTunes.

You can subscribe to future podcasts through Stitcher SmartRadio or iTunes, or by downloading the iPhone app. Or you may listen to the podcast on the JW's Financial Coaching Facebook Fan page.

00:0000:00
  • Different format to the show today
  • Sharing my thoughts from doing 100 lessons of the show
  • Doing the podcast has taught me a lot about money
  • How you can help show your support for the show
  • How you can buy a copy of "A Tale of Two Houses"

The JW’s Financial Coaching Podcast_100

For the 100th lesson of the JW's Financial Coaching Podcast, we're going to do something different. I'm sharing 100 different money thoughts I've learned since I started the show.

If you have been a listener to the show for a long period of time you know that there have been more than 100 lessons of the show. I originally started the show back in 2010 and only started to number the lessons in 2012.

Either way for today I started out by coming up 100 short thoughts I have come to believe while doing the show. These 100 then were grouped in 14 different categories.  They are:

  1. Money is . . .
  2. Debt
  3. Owning a home
  4. Giving
  5. Budgeting
  6. Spending
  7. Joint Finances
  8. Investing
  9. Saving
  10. Credit Scores
  11. Education
  12. Taxes
  13. Emergency Fund
  14. Podcasting

Hopefully you enjoy the show, I'd love to hear feedback on whether or not you enjoyed it. Ultimately thought I couldn't do it without you. I know I always say that, but I say it because it is true. Thank you for being a listener to the show, I am excited to share with you some big things I have for the show later on this year.

Also "A Tale of Two Houses-Our journey of buying a home the right way after buying one the wrong way" is now available for pre-sale. The book releases April 12th but order now to get the lowest price you'll find it and receive two exclusive bonuses for pre-ordering the book.

Enjoyed this lesson? If so, please consider taking a few minutes to leave a review of the show either in Stitcher SmartRadio, or iTunes. For a step by step video of how that works, please watch this video on how to leave a review in iTunes.

You can subscribe to future podcasts through Stitcher SmartRadio or iTunes, or by downloading the iPhone app. Or you may listen to the podcast on the JW's Financial Coaching Facebook Fan page.

March 20, 2016  
00:0000:00
  • What we learned when purchasing a new vehicle
  • Why our opinion of car payments was reinforced
  • How paying for cars in cash is worth the price
  • "A Tale of Two Houses" Webinar replay
  • Quote of the lesson from Dave Ramsey

The JW’s Financial Coaching Podcast_99

Today's lesson we share a recent personal story of how we paid cash for our latest vehicle purchase. Paying for a new vehicle in cash felt amazing, but also left me in a little bit of a haze. Find out what put me in the haze, and how I snapped out of it.

Just for fun I decided to determine what our payment would have been had we took out a loan. I then compared it to our budget and tried to determine what we would have had to cut out of the budget to make our car payment fit and the options weren't pretty.

Also find out how our beliefs about debt were reinforced during the process and ultimately why we don't have a car payment.

If you are working towards paying off your car loan and want to pay cash for your next vehicle, let this lesson be an encouragement to you. The price to pay to make this happen is steep, especially for your first cash car. But the pain is worth it. The feeling of not having a car payment and the flexibility to give, invest, and pay extra on our mortgage trumps any need to drive a better car.

Other lesson's mention in today's lesson:

Today's quote of the lesson is brought to you by my new book A Tale of Two Houses

"'The worst car accidents happen on the showroom floor.”Dave Ramsey

Enjoyed this lesson? If so, please consider taking a few minutes to leave a review of the show either in Stitcher SmartRadio, or iTunes. For a step by step video of how that works, please watch this video on how to leave a review in iTunes.

You can subscribe to future podcasts through Stitcher SmartRadio or iTunes, or by downloading the iPhone app. Or you may listen to the podcast on the JW's Financial Coaching Facebook Fan page.

February 1, 2016  
00:0000:00
  • It's important to know what to do when purchasing a home
  • Even more important to know what to do before you start the process
  • The most important three things to do before we purchase a home
  • Revelation of the title to my book on buying and selling a new home
  • Quote of the lesson from Suze Orman

The JW’s Financial Coaching Podcast_94

The whole home buying process can be stressful. Because of that, I'm releasing a book this spring which details our experience in buying a home. Not only do we share our story but we also give tips and advice on what to expect as well as break down some of the hidden costs of buying a home.

On today's lesson we are going to discuss the three things to consider before purchasing a home. They are the following:

  1. Become debt free-Being debt free has a lot of benefits in other areas than purchasing a home but in purchasing a home, being debt free has a lot of benefits. It reduces risk, makes it easier to qualify for a mortgage, and frees up cash. These all help when becoming a home owner and allows your home to be a financial gain instead of a financial strain.
  2. Have an Emergency Fund-Having an emergency fund goes hand in hand with being debt free. Owning a home is a great thing, but anyone who has owned a home for more than 30 days can tell you that there are a lot of sudden expenses with buying a home. Some are small expenses but others such as a broken heater, leaky roof, or an air conditioner unit that isn't working are huge expenses. If we don't have an emergency fund then we usually turn back to debt to replace those large home expenses and that restarts the debt cycle. However with an emergency fund that buys us some time and space to make those repairs and it won't put us in as much risk.
  3. Knowing how much you can afford-We all have an idea of what we can afford when buying a home. But it is important to establish the boundary before you start to look at houses! Buying a house can be an emotional and impulse purchase so it's important to establish what your mortgage will be. Once we look at homes that are out of our price range we are probably going to end up purchasing a home that is out of our price range.

Now granted, doing all three of these things might slow down our ability to purchase a home. In fact it could slow down the process significantly. But you know what? I'm still doing it. If you do all of the above three things you will probably be better prepared than 99% of other home buyers and it will allow you not to rush into the home buying process.

Speaking of the home buying process, I've finally completed my book on our family's story of buying a home in 2013. It is scheduled to be released later this spring and on today's lesson I'm excited to announce that the name of the book is, "A Tale of Two Houses: Our journey of buying a home the right way after buying one the wrong way." Thanks to all of you who gave your thoughts on the book title. Also stayed tuned in the next few weeks as I get prepared to accept applications to become a member of my book launch team for those of you who are interested.

Also on today's lesson I give a quick review of Pat Flynn's new book Will it Fly. I've had a chance to read an advanced copy and love the book. If you are looking to or are even remotely thinking of starting a business of any size, please check this book out first. Pat's book will challenge you but also force you to look at some things before you put all the time, effort, and money in that you need to launch a successful business. You can order his book on Amazon.com

Today's quote of the lesson is brought to you by Audible.com.

"It's easy to underestimate the real cost of home ownershipSuze Orman

Enjoyed this lesson? If so, please consider taking a few minutes to leave a review of the show either in Stitcher SmartRadio, or iTunes. For a step by step video of how that works, please watch this video on how to leave a review in iTunes.

You can subscribe to future podcasts through Stitcher SmartRadio or iTunes, or by downloading the iPhone app. Or you may listen to the podcast on the JW's Financial Coaching Facebook Fan page.

December 1, 2015  
00:0000:00
  • Want to set a solid financial foundation but don't know where to start?
  • Five exercises to take control of your finances
  • Why it is important to have your goals set before the new year
  • How to enter for a chance to a win a copy of "The School of Greatness" by Lewis Howes
  • Quote of the lesson

The JW’s Financial Coaching Podcast_90

Hard to believe it but 2015 is almost over. That means it's time to focus on what we want to do in 2016. You might be thinking, "Wow, can't I enjoy Christmas first before I focus on 2016?" While that is true, the thing I've noticed with setting and achieving goals is that the sooner you know what they are, the easier it is to work your goals and ultimately achieve your goals.

Because of that fact today we're starting a two part series on the podcast on short little daily exercises we can start to take control of your finances. We'll do five today and then five on the next lesson. My recommendation is that over the course of a week you one of these exercises a day and after doing each one you will have a better idea of where you stand financially and know what the next steps are in your financial journey.

Below are the five exercises we talk about on today's lesson:

Day 1-Figuring out your Net Worth

Day 2-Listing out your Debt

Day 3-Creating a simple Budget

Day 4-Emergency Savings

Day 5-Sell some of your stuff

This podcast is inspired by a 10 part video series I did at the beginning of the year titled, Countdown to take control of 2015.

Also on the podcast I announce the kickoff to a promotion I'm doing in the month December. I'll be giving away a copy of the New York Times and Amazon Best Seller “The School of Greatness” by Lewis Howes.

As someone who has read “The School of Greatness” (Currently reading it for the second time) and have worked through the exercises in the book, I can tell you the words are inspiring and the material works. It’s not a magic book though, you just can't read it and everything change in your life. You have to be motivated and dedicated to achieve your dreams and goals. But hearing Lewis and other people’s stories of overcoming adversity to achieve great things in their field is rather motivating and inspiring.

There are two ways to get your name entered into the drawing

  1. Take a five question survey about your financial goals

As a better way to serve you, I’m conducting a five question survey regarding your financial goals and how we at JWFinancialCoaching.com can help you achieve those goals. The survey shouldn’t take more than five minutes. But the results are really important in helping identify what your financial goals and needs are and helps us to create material that will give you a new perspective on your money which will help improve your economy.

The survey is anonymous,  but to get entered into the drawing you will need to input your email at the end of the survey. You can view the survey at JWFinancialCoaching.com/Survey

  1. Subscribe to the JW’s Financial Coaching Newsletter

If you haven’t subscribed to the Newsletter yet, simply enter your name and email and you will be signed up. By doing so you’ll get an email in your inbox once a month or so encouraging you to focus on improving your economy.

As an added bonus, you’ll also receive a link to listen to JW’s Manifesto on Money audio book. This is a 20 minute audio book sharing my views on money and how it impacts every part of our lives.

To signup please visit JWFinancialCoaching.com/Newsletter or you can signup at the end of the survey

The deadline to enter is Monday December 20th at 11:59 PM EST

If you are interested in purchasing “The School of Greatness” on your own please visit Greatnessbook.com.

Today's quote of the lesson is brought to you by Audible.com.

"Winning is a habit, unfortunately so is losing ”Vince Lombardi

Enjoyed this lesson? If so, please consider taking a few minutes to leave a review of the show either in Stitcher SmartRadio, or iTunes. For a step by step video of how that works, please watch this video on how to leave a review in iTunes.

You can subscribe to future podcasts through Stitcher SmartRadio or iTunes, or by downloading the iPhone app. Or you may listen to the podcast on the JW's Financial Coaching Facebook Fan page.

July 27, 2014  
00:0000:00
  • How people can be in the same situation but experience a completely different result
  • Based on Jim Collins chapter in Great by Choice on Return on Luck
  • How to get to the best return on your luck and to avoid making bad luck a disaster
  • We all catch breaks; it's what you do with those breaks that matter the most
  • How are your 2014 goals coming along?

Have you ever noticed how you can have people in the identical situation, yet the results vary drastically? Why does this happen? Is there a particular reason why some prosper in certain situation while others struggle to stay afloat? Today we examine this situation further and try to come up with an explanation.

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