JW’s Financial Coaching Podcast JW’s Financial Coaching Podcast-A show devoted to answering your personal financial questions and covering current events in personal finance. Giving people a new perspective on their money!

November 19, 2015  
00:0000:00
  • How being healthy improves our bottom line
  • Eating healthy improves our waist line and our wallet
  • It sounds obvious but being healthy saves you money at the doctor
  • Want to make more money? Try resting more
  • Quote of the lesson

The JW's Financial Coaching Podcast_89

One of the things that I have really been trying to be conscious of this year is my health. It's been a process and I am by no means perfect, but I've come to grips with the fact that how I treat my body impacts how I feel at that moment. I used to eat whatever I felt like, sleep whenever, and exercise when I had the time, but now that doesn't work well with me.

Becoming more health conscious has many benefits, including helping our finances. On today's lesson I cover four benefits that living a healthy lifestyle has on our finances. They are below:

  • Save money on food. This applies to both the grocery store and eating out. We hear about how much more expensive it is to eat more healthily and there is some truth to that. But when you start to eat healthy you realize how much it costs to eat fast food, ice cream, and Oreos.
  • Save money on insurance. This sounds pretty obvious but when we are healthier we tend to get sick less. This then costs us less to insure and saves us tons in deductibles and co-payments. It also lessens our chances of certain long term diseases which then in turn costs us less in life insurance.
  • Eliminates idle spending. Eating well, sleeping more, and exercising takes a lot of time and effort, time and effort that perhaps we would have spent instead on idle spending at stores or online retailers. Idle spending is the worst because after one month we have hardly used the item we bought and can't tell anyone why we bought it in the first place but if you have less idle time you have less time to spend.
  • Help our performance at work. How many of us are dragging at work? It might be because we don't like where we work, which is another lesson in and of itself. But being healthier gives us more energy to perform at our job or in our business. Often the work environment isn't always healthy as we might be sitting at our desk all day staring at a computer screen and eating sweets. That makes it hard to perform when you aren't feeling your best. But what if you are performing at your best? Wouldn't that tend to making more money in the long run?

This lesson isn't a direct one on finances but an indirect lesson on how living healthy helps our finances. Again I still have a long way to go, but one of the big steps for me was realizing that what I was doing was impacting my life. Therefore I needed to do something about it.

Remember, money is an important part of life, but not the most important thing. It's important to be well rounded in our faith, family, career, and health in addition to our money.

This lesson’s quote is brought to you by Audible.com.

"It is one thing to record what you spend, it is another to plan how you are going to spend things before it happens ”Russ Carroll

Enjoyed this lesson? If so, please consider taking a few minutes to leave a review of the show either in Stitcher SmartRadio, or iTunes. For a step by step video of how that works, please watch this video on how to leave a review in iTunes.

You can subscribe to future podcasts through Stitcher SmartRadio or iTunes, or by downloading the iPhone app. Or you may listen to the podcast on the JW's Financial Coaching Facebook Fan page.

March 23, 2015  
00:0000:00
  • A lot of times financial stress is caused by using financial products not in a way that they were originally intended for
  • Why retirement, insurance, emergency savings, and your house shouldn't be used for other things
  • How using those products what they were intended for will make your financial life easier
  • What to do with your tax refund
  • Quote of the week

JW Financial Coaching Podcast 85For a lot of us, money can be a difficult and confusing thing to grasp. There are a lot of reasons for this including lack of financial awareness, family history, no desire to learn how to handle money. But the more and more I hear people talk about their money struggles the more I realize that some of the confusion results from us using financial product for other uses other than their original intent.

Today we are going to talk through four different financial products/assets that we are using for a different use than their original intent. Some of these we use differently because we are marketed to that way via the banks or some salesman. Others non-original uses result from just not being prepared or paying attention to our finances. Below are the four that we will talk about today

Financial Product/Asset Intended Use Un-Intended Use
401(K)/IRA (Retirement) To save for use after retirement Pay off debt/Emergency Fund
Insurance Protect family financially in case of negative life event (death, disability, accident) Way to save for retirement or children's college fund
Emergency Savings Keep family from falling off financial cliff in case of a financial emergency Use to fund inconvenices that weren't planned for
House Place to eat, sleep, and live your life Emergency Fund/Retirement Funding

 

Now we aren’t picking on anyone if you have or are doing any of these. But after going through the list it’s no wonder why money can be so confusing. But when we use these products for their original use our lives are less cluttered and our finances become clearer.

Below are other blogs or lessons of the show where I talk about these products more in depth.

In addition I also comment about an article I found on bankrate.com titled “How Americans will spend their tax refund”. 30% of Americans will use their refund to pay down their debt. While that is very admirable I can’t help but wonder how many of them have debt because they got a refund? The reason for the refund is because you have too much withheld from your paycheck. Instead of scrapping by, wouldn’t it be better to get your money each month and use that to avoid debt in the first place?

This lesson’s quote is brought to you by Audible.com

“Someone else is happy with less than what you have” ~ Unknown

Enjoyed this lesson? If so, please consider taking a few minutes to leave a review of the show either in Stitcher SmartRadio, or iTunes. For a step by step video of how that works, please watch this video on how to leave a review in iTunes.

You can subscribe to future podcasts through Stitcher SmartRadio or iTunes, or by downloading the iPhone app. Or you may listen to the podcast on the JW's Financial Coaching Facebook Fan page.

If you have any comments, questions, or ideas for future shows you can send them to me and I will integrate them into a future show. There are two ways to get in touch with me: 1.) Email me at JWFinancialcoaching@gmail.com - Please put “podcast” in the subject line and keep your questions brief so they are readable on air. 2.) Simply fill out the form on the contact page. Please fill out your name, email, and your question/comment/suggestion and we will read it on air.

You can find prior editions of the podcast at the podcast archive page.

December 16, 2014  
00:0000:00
  • What the Latte Factor metaphor is
  • Popularized by David Bach's book Automatic Millionaire
  • What you can do instead of the Latte Factor
  • What are you doing with your extra money from lower gas prices?
  • Quote of the week

The JW’s Financial Coaching Podcast_81

I love to read. I especially love to read books on personal finance. It doesn't matter who is the author. Lately I've read a few books from Ramit Sethi (I Will Teach You to Be Rich) and Zac Bissonnette (How to Be Richer, Smarter, and Better Looking Than Your Parents) that mentioned the Latte Factor. In reading other books over the years I've heard a lot about the Latte Factor, both good and bad but never fully checked it out for myself until recently.

For those of you who don't know, The Latte Factor is a metaphor created by personal finance author David Bach and is predominately featured in his book The Automatic Millionaire (You can download a free audio copy at Audible.com). The Latte Factor is a metaphor on investing which shows how the everyday small expenses can cost you thousands or even millions over time.

The concept is simple; take that "small" daily habit that you spend money on whether it is your daily latte, fast food trip, pack of cigarettes, etc. If you took that amount and instead invested it it would grow.  Below is an example from the book on how much money you would invest if you cut out the $3.50 out of your daily spending or $5.00:

LatteFactor1As you can see after a decade you would have a good chunk of money, but not life changing money. But looks at what happens if you invested that amount each month earning an average of 10% a year

LatteFactor3With that being said on today's lesson of the show I share the pro's and con's of the Latte Factor metaphor. Overall I think it is a great metaphor and anything that motivates people to start to get into investing I'm all for. But I also like focusing on the bigger stuff instead of having to scrimp and cut out a lot of smaller things in your budget. So what instead if we did, not the Latte Factor, but the Car Payment Factor?

The average car payment today is $470. Below is what would happen if you invested the average car payment, or half of the average payment:

LatteFactor2That is an expensive car payment! We cover all of these topics and more on today's lesson. But what are your thoughts on the Latte Factor? Have you given up small daily pleasures for bigger gains? What have the results been?

This lesson’s quote is brought to you by the JW's Financial Coaching Newsletter and comes to us from Albert Einstein:

"The hardest thing in the world to understand is the income tax.”

Enjoyed this lesson? If so, please consider taking a few minutes to leave a review of the show either in Stitcher SmartRadio, or iTunes. For a step by step video of how that works, please watch this video on how to leave a review in iTunes.

You can subscribe to future podcasts through FeedburnerStitcher SmartRadioiTunes, or by downloading the iPhone app. Or you may listen to the podcast on the JW's Financial Coaching Facebook Fan page.

If you have any comments, questions, or ideas for future shows you can send them to me and I will integrate them into a future show. There are two ways to get in touch with me: 1.) Email me at JWFinancialcoaching@gmail.com - Please put “podcast” in the subject line and keep your questions brief so they are readable on air. 2.) Simply fill out the form on the contact page. Please fill out your name, email, and your question/comment/suggestion and we will read it on air.

You can find prior editions of the podcast at the podcast archive page.

June 22, 2014  
00:0000:00
  • Inspired by last weekend being Father's day weekend
  • Challenge/Encouragement to all the Dads listening
  • Take the lead in your families finances
  • Best way your children will learn is from you
  • Still applies to you even if you aren't a dad

With last week being Father's Day, today's lessons is achallenge/encouragement/motivation on Father's taking the lead on our families finances. Yes, schools need to teach our children about how money works in our schools. But the best teach on finances isn't in your child's school. It is the people who live in their homes.

Today's lesson is full of ways to take the lead in your families finances either with your spouse or teaching your child about money. Don't worry if you don't have to be perfect to take the lead. We've all made mistakes with finances.

Even if you aren't a father the principal of taking the lead in your families finances still applies.

Enjoyed this lesson? If so please consider taking five minutes to leave a review of the show either in Stitcher SmartRadio, or iTunes. For a step by step video of how that works, please watch this video on how to leave a review in iTunes.

You can subscribe to future podcasts through FeedburnerStitcher SmartRadioiTunes, or by downloading the iPhone app. Or you may listen to the podcast on the JW's Financial Coaching Facebook Fan page.

If you have any comments, questions, or ideas for future shows you can send them to me and I will integrate them into a future show. There are two ways to get in touch with me: 1.) Email me at JWFinancialcoaching@gmail.com - Please put “podcast” in the subject line and keep your questions brief so they are readable on air. 2.) Simply fill out the form on the contact page. Please fill out your name, email, and your question/comment/suggestion and we will read it on air.

You can find prior editions of the podcast at the podcast archive page.

March 2, 2014  
00:0000:00

Highlights of today's show:

  • What to do after your consumer debt is gone; save for retirement or pay extra on the mortgage
  • Pros and Cons of investing for retirement
  • Pros and Cons of paying extra on the mortgage
  • Why my wife and I currently do both
  • What I have been reading lately

What would your rather do with your extra money each month; invest for retirement or pay extra on the mortgage. Now no matter what you do, investing for retirement and paying extra on the mortgage are both good things to do.  But is one preferable to the other? Today we break down the pros and cons of doing each and I share what my wife and I are currently doing with our extra money.

Credit: Preppers Bug Out Bag

To get more information on investing for retirement and paying extra on the mortgage check out the following podcast lessons and blog posts:

Investing for retirement

Paying extra on the mortgage

In addition I also share what I have been reading lately. Reading is still one of the best ways to learn. Even though I love reading about personal finance that's not the only thing I encourage you to read. Right now I am reading Meg Meeker's Boys Should Be Boys: 7 Secrets to Raising Healthy Sons. This book has really helped and encourage me to be a better dad for my boys. To listen to this and other books please checkout audible.com and  and visit jwfinancialcoaching.com/audible to receive a free download of an audio book of your choice.

Enjoyed this lesson? If so please consider taking five minutes to leave a review of the show either in Stitcher SmartRadio, or iTunes. For a step by step video of how that works, please watch this video on how to leave a review in iTunes.

You can subscribe to future podcasts through FeedburnerStitcher SmartRadioiTunes, or by downloading the iPhone app. Or you may listen to the podcast on the JW's Financial Coaching Facebook Fan page.

If you have any comments, questions, or ideas for future shows you can send them to me and I will integrate them into a future show. There are two ways to get in touch with me: 1.) Email me at JWFinancialcoaching@gmail.com - Please put “podcast” in the subject line and keep your questions brief so they are readable on air. 2.) Simply fill out the form on the contact page. Please fill out your name, email, and your question/comment/suggestion and we will read it on air.

You can find prior editions of the podcast at the podcast archive page.

February 24, 2014  
00:0000:00

Highlights of today's show:

  • Advertisers know what to do with your tax refund
  • The three basic things to know about the tax systems
  • Ways to lower your taxable income
  • Tax credits you might qualify for
  • Why I think the tax system is too complex

After talking about four major tax myths in last weeks lesson, today we share tips on how to reduce your taxes for this upcoming filing season and beyond. Before we learn how to lower our taxes we first need to know the following three basic things:

  1. Our Adjusted Gross Income (AGI)-Our AGI is the amount that we pay taxes on before deductions and credits are removed.
  2. Tax Brackets-It is important to know what tax bracket you are in because it will help determine the tax impacts of having certain deductions or added income. To view what tax bracket you are in for 2013 check out this link.
  3. Do you take the standard deduction or do you itemize? The government allows us to deduct certain expenses on our taxes; mortgage interest, charitable contributions, property taxes paid, state and local taxes paid are the most common. But we can deduct those only if they exceed the standard deduction which is the amount that everyone may deduct from their AGI. In 2013 the Standard Deduction is $12,200 for married couples and $6,100 for individuals.

After knowing these three basic things we can now discuss ways to lower our AGI. There are two major ways to do that:

  1. Contribute to a Health Savings Account (HSA)-I love my HSA and for good reason. A HSA is a savings account attached to high deductible health insurance plan that you and your employer contribute to. As long as you use your account to pay for qualified health expenses the contributions are tax free! Your contributions reduce your AGI which ultimately lowers your tax bill.
  2. Contribute to a 401(K) or IRA-Who says savings doesn't pay off? Not only are your saving for your future when you contribute to a retirement account but it can help save us come tax time.

Now that we have lowered our taxable income, we can now focus on tax credits. There are a lot of tax credits available to us, check out IRS.gov for a full list of 2013 tax credits but below are some common ones you may quality for:

  1. Child credit-You get a credit of $1,000 per child under the age of 17 on your taxes. This is to help offset the cost of raising your child. If you are parents you know that a child cost more than $1,000 a year to raise, but I'm not complaining.
  2. Education Credits-Go back to school this year to work on your bachelors or masters? You may qualify for educational credits.
  3. Adoption Credit-If you adopted a child in 2013 you may qualify for a reimbursement of up to $12,970.

Worn out yet? If so I don't blame you. After doing two lessons worth of shows on taxes I'm really frustrated with the tax system. At the end of the show I give my opinion (rant?) on the state of the current tax system and share why I think major reform needs to be made.

Finally we also discuss how the marketers on TV and radio definitely have a plan for your bonus and tax refund. They want you to buy a new car, take a vacation, or remodel your home. Not that those things are nice but do we you have a plan for your tax refund? Like our monthly income, a large financial windfall needs to have a plan to best be used effectively. For advice on how to handle your refund this year check out the podcast I did on receiving a financial windfall.

Enjoyed this lesson? If so please consider taking five minutes to leave a review of the show either in Stitcher SmartRadio, or iTunes. For a step by step video of how that works, please watch this video on how to leave a review in iTunes.

You can subscribe to future podcasts through FeedburnerStitcher SmartRadioiTunes, or by downloading the iPhone app. Or you may listen to the podcast on the JW's Financial Coaching Facebook Fan page.

If you have any comments, questions, or ideas for future shows you can send them to me and I will integrate them into a future show. There are two ways to get in touch with me: 1.) Email me at JWFinancialcoaching@gmail.com - Please put “podcast” in the subject line and keep your questions brief so they are readable on air. 2.) Simply fill out the form on the contact page. Please fill out your name, email, and your question/comment/suggestion and we will read it on air.

You can find prior editions of the podcast at the podcast archive page.

February 9, 2014  
00:0000:00

Highlights of today's show:

  • Is freezing your credit report right for you?
  • How freezing your credit can help protect against identity theft
  • The downsides of freezing your credit
  • Should I take the stability of a company into account when choosing a term life policy?
  • What happens when your life insurance company goes into receivership

Identity theft is one of the worst financial events one can go through. When your identity is stolen you aren't responsible for any of the charges made in your name. However you are going to spend hours upon hours fighting to clear your name of any wrong doing.

Fortunately there is a way to help lower your odds against identity theft and that is by freezing your credit. Freezing your credit is a process that disables most creditors from pulling a copy of your credit report or your credit score.

On today's show we break down the pros and cons of freezing your credit and discuss whether it is the right thing for you to do. It isn't for everyone but if you are committed to stop borrowing then freezing your credit report might be the way to go. The fees to freeze your credit vary by state and you have to freeze your credit report at each of the following credit bureaus:

In addition we also answer the following question sent in by a listener:

"I have two term policies and I feel as if I'm paying too much. I've seen better quotes elsewhere and I'm wondering how concerned I should be with the company issuing the policy.  Should I take the stability of a company into account when choosing a term policy?"

This is a great question. To answer it we first need to discuss what happens if your life insurance company goes belly up. If your life insurance company is under financial distress each state has their own agency with its own rules as to what happens with your policy. The state agency will first try to rehabilitate the company back to financial health. If that doesn't work, good policies are shopped around to other companies. If that doesn't work, each state guarantees a maximum amount to life insurance claims. To check our your state's maximum coverage payout visit The National Organization of Life and Health Insurance Guaranty Associations (NOHLGA.com) website and select your state.

For most states the maximum payout is $300,000. So while you are guaranteed to get at least something if your life insurance company face financial trouble, you are never fully guaranteed. To measure the health of a life insurance company consider looking at Standard and Poor and Moody's Life insurance ratings.

With that being said, if you find a company with a solid rating that has been around for a while and it offers a lower rate than your current term insurance, I say go ahead and switch as long as you wait until the new policy is in place before you cancel your old one. Life insurance companies rarely fail and even if it does happen it is not like you will lose your coverage as your state guarantees at least a $300,000 payout per policy.

To send in your question to be answered on the show please visit our contact page and fill out the contact form.

Enjoy this lesson? If so please consider taking five minutes to leave a review of the show either in Stitcher SmartRadio, or iTunes. For a step by step video of how that works, please watch this video on how to leave a review in iTunes.

You can subscribe to future podcasts through FeedburnerStitcher SmartRadioiTunes, or by downloading the iPhone app. Or you may listen to the podcast on the JW's Financial Coaching Facebook Fan page.

If you have any comments, questions, or ideas for future shows you can send them to me and I will integrate them into a future show. There are two ways to get in touch with me: 1.) Email me at JWFinancialcoaching@gmail.com - Please put “podcast” in the subject line and keep your questions brief so they are readable on air. 2.) Simply fill out the form on the contact page. Please fill out your name, email, and your question/comment/suggestion and we will read it on air.

You can find prior editions of the podcast at the podcast archive page.

February 3, 2014  
00:0000:00

Highlights of today's show:

  • Five good financial habits to start doing today
  • The power of good habits on your life
  • The need to invest in yourself
  • How giving with purpose will improve your finances
  • Importance of continuing to learn

As a follow up to last weeks lesson on the five bad financial habits that are the toughest to break we talk about five good financial habits to start doing today. Good financial habits allow you to do incredible things, not just with your money but with your life. Today we talk about the following habits.

  • Continually Learning
  • Investing in yourself
  • Automation
  • Looking at how your current actions impact your future opportunities
  • Giving with a purpose

Is there a good habit that you started doing that has paid off? Feel free to share it with us below.

Enjoy this lesson? If so please consider taking five minutes and leaving a review of the show either in Stitcher SmartRadio, or iTunes. For a step by step video of how that works, please watch this video on how to leave a review in iTunes.

You can subscribe to future podcasts through FeedburnerStitcher SmartRadioiTunes, or download the iPhone app. Or you may listen to the podcast on the JW's Financial Coaching Facebook Fan page.

If you have any comments, questions, or ideas for future shows you can send them to me and I will integrate them into a future show. There are two ways to get in touch with me: 1.) Email me at JWFinancialcoaching@gmail.com - Please put “podcast” in the subject line and keep your questions brief so they are readable on air. 2.) Simply fill out the form on the contact page. Please fill out your name, email, and your question/comment/suggestion and we will read it on air.

You can find prior editions of the podcast at the podcast archive page.

January 26, 2014  
00:0000:00

Highlights of today's show:

  • The five toughest financial habits to break
  • My observations from working with clients over the years
  • How to break those bad habits
  • Your list of bad financial habits
  • How you can contribute to the completion of my new book

Websters defines a habit as a usual way of behaving or something that a person does often in a regular and repeated way. As a financial coach I've seen how good financial habits can help you reach your goals and I've also seen how bad financial habits can prevent you from reaching those same goals. Today I'm going to discuss the five bad financial habits that are the toughest to break.

These five habits are the toughest to break based on my experience in coaching with clients over the years. They are as follows:

5. Getting organized

4. Not having an Emergency Fund

3. Spend Now; Pay Later

2. Not working together with your spouse

  1. Pay Day Loans

We discuss each bad habit and cover a little bit how you can get away from each one. Unfortunately bad habits aren't easy to break, but you can break them over time.

Also I have created a survey to help with the creation of my new book on buying and selling a home. As many of you know my wife and I went through the process this past summer and it definitely is a life event. But the experience was a lot better then my first experience in real estate. Because I want your home buying experience to be a memorable one I'm writing a book detailing the real cost of buying a home by sharing our experience in addition to tips I've learned when coaching clients.

The survey is 9 questions long, totally anonymous, and is not a commitment on your part to buy the book when it is released. Even if you aren't planning on buying a home any time soon, please take the time to fill out the survey as your input is still valuable to us.

Enjoy this lesson? If so please consider taking five minutes and leaving a review of the show either in Stitcher SmartRadio, or iTunes. For a step by step video of how that works, please watch this video on how to leave a review in iTunes.

You can subscribe to future podcasts through FeedburnerStitcher SmartRadio, iTunes, or download the iPhone app. Or you may listen to the podcast on the JW's Financial Coaching Facebook Fan page. In addition, if you have enjoyed the show for a while now, please leave a review of the podcast on iTunes.

If you have any comments, questions, or ideas for future shows you can send them to me and I will integrate them into a future show. There are two ways to get in touch with me: 1.) Email me at JWFinancialcoaching@gmail.com - Please put “podcast” in the subject line and keep your questions brief so they are readable on air. 2.) Simply fill out the form on the contact page. Please fill out your name, email, and your question/comment/suggestion and we will read it on air.

You can find prior editions of the podcast at the podcast archive page.

January 19, 2014  
00:0000:00

Highlights of today's show:

  • Greg Pare joins me on the show
  • Shares how to B.A.N.K more in One Four
  • What happens when you budget your money before the month begins
  • The importance of knowing your why
  • Do something to make your 2014 a better year financially

Greg Pare from Gregpare.com joins me on today's show to discuss how you can B.A.N.K More in One Four. Most people set resolutions and goals in the new year but fail to reach them. According to a ComPsych Magazine survey, 92% of people lose sleep over finances. Greg came up with this concept as a way to show people how they can actually plan to save more and achieve their desired result.

Before you can B.A.N.K More in One Four however, you must first know your Why, according to Greg. This is important because knowing your Why will allow you to reach your goal.

"If your Why is strong enough, you'll figure out How." ~ Greg Pare

Greg and I discuss the B.A.N.K concept and what each letter stands for.

B-Is for budget. The word "Budget" can be a scary word for a lot of people. If the thought of budgeting your whole income scares you, just budget for one thing. It can be as little as setting aside $50 a month to have $600 at the end of the year for Christmas. But the point is that you have to plan where your money is going before you can actually save the money.

A-Is for action. It is one thing to say what you are going to do; it is another thing to actually accomplish it. Greg and I share how to take action and Greg breaks down the five things you need to do to set goals.

N-Is for saying no. This is in saying no to yourself. This is the shortest answer but also the most difficult to do. It is hard to say No to yourself initially but once you get some positive momentum going and you see the long term results of saying no, your ability to continue to say no will grow stronger.

K-is for killing debt. Greg and I share the benefits of getting out of debt. You might not be able to pay off all your debt this year and that's OK. But make it a priority to pay off at least one debt this year. That way instead of paying interest you get to keep that money for yourself.

You can learn more about Greg by visiting his blog, checking him out on Facebook, and following him on Twitter.

If you would like to hear more about my views on money, please sign up for our monthly newsletter. Once your subscription is confirmed you will receive a download to my audio recording of the "JW's Manifesto on Money" that goes in depth on my views about money.

You can subscribe to future podcasts through FeedburnerStitcher SmartRadio, or iTunes. Or you may listen to the podcast on the JW's Financial Coaching Facebook Fan page. In addition, if you have enjoyed the show for a while now, please leave a review of the podcast on iTunes. For a step by step video of how that works, please watch this video on how to leave a review in iTunes.

If you have any comments, questions, or ideas for future shows you can send them to me and I will integrate them into a future show. There are two ways to get in touch with me: 1.) Email me at JWFinancialcoaching@gmail.com - Please put “podcast” in the subject line and keep your questions brief so they are readable on air. 2.) Simply fill out the form on the contact page. Please fill out your name, email, and your question/comment/suggestion and we will read it on air.

You can find prior editions of the podcast at the podcast archive page.

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